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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
a potential of what was already a horrible, horrible situation if iran and syria, hezbollah, if they were to retaliate against israel, that would dramatically escalate what is already going on. >> reporter: certainly. very dangerous to make a prediction in this part of the world and given what is happening inside syria, particularly damascus on their back foot and perhaps prone to irrational responses. as we're seeing at the moment, most observers think that an overretaliation is unlikely. of course syria, its military heavily stretched by this civil war. particularly given how israel now denying any real involvement. hezbollah and a very delicate balance here. of course their military allied to the assad regime but they have a very cautious political role to play here. they don't want to get into a lengthy military issue with the israelis and, of course, iran. certainly leadership driven by division. many not quite sure what they could do. concerns about some sort of covert retaliation, how ever that may play out. people are waiting to see if this is vague and at times in the past 24 hou
with hezbollah, with hamas. they are destabilize go to israel. we may be on different time track than their nuclear weapons problem. so, there is going to come on a time we have to make a different decision? >> we've always said all options is on the table. the president has been clear on that. i am glad you raised the terrorism as peculiar of iran's behavior. there is so much attention on the effort to prevent them from getting a nuclear weapon that we sometimes overlook the active efforts by the iranian revolutionary guard, their proxies like the lebanese hezbollah, to engage asags nations, bombings, destabilizing countries. that has been a very challenging ongoing threat. for a while, i have to tell you, when i came into office there were too many countries that were turning a blind eye to it. we have worked very hard to get the international community particularly the region, europe and elsewhere to say wait a minute. these guys need to be stopped on the terrorism front. they can't be permitted to go forward. when we found out about the plot to kill the ambassador here in washingt
moving advanced weapons, including anti-aircraft missiles to the islamist militant group hezbollah in lebanon. syriaa say tv's accusing israel of bombing a military research center northwest of the capital of damascus, but that has not been confirmed. for more on the implications of the israeli attack on syria, and joined by fox news national security analyst who has held security posts under presidents ford, nixon, and reagan. so this attack by israel on syria, is syria going to interpret it as an act of war. >> they have a civil war of their own, so they don't have much. lori: what about them? >> listen, why is israel doing this? is looking and syria and thinking, yaks, chemical weapons. we want to make sure whatever happens, especially that explodes, that those chemical weapons are now used against israel. the second thing or read about is surface-to-air missiles which is what was probably in the convoy attacked. why? because they know if their is a military operation against iran, let's say six months from now i year from now is well as a pre-emptive strike against the iranian
of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and key regional arenas across the middle east. this year's line that are the islamic republic of iran on these groups have paid off because now their regional allies have become the most influential players in their respective arenas today. the result is today's the islamic republic of iran and its ideas of the pacific tory government and independent foreign policy that has real influence, real power in countries across the middle east from egypt to bahrain that were once clearly in america's camp. in strategic terms, the islamic republic of iran has been dependencies into its narrative not its drones, not its tanks, using political awakening of middle eastern public to offer the very nature of power politics in the middle east. at least describe in our book, to "going to tehran," it has been effective foreign policy and national security strategy for the islamic republic of iran, one repeatedly underappreciated in the united states.
no longer has a convenient way of shuttling weapons to hezbollah, its shit militia in lebanon, and they go back to a world where it is iran, iraq an leban,asically as its shiite bastions and that is not in their interests, of course. and there is so much, you know, i mean it's hard to overemphasize the importance that like how goes syria so goes os region so to speak. i mean the shifting that balance in terms of to a sunni majority rule would have huge ripple affects for the entire region and iran is very nervous about that. >> so how is assad handling his own security? he saw his brother-ilaw d seralisop natiol security people in a bomb that took place inside what i would assume a safe area. so he had to say to himself they got -- there they could get here. one said he was sleeping in different places and all of that. >> i have heard so many rumors. he's living in latakia, he is sleeping on a naval ship. he is in the pal dferb -- palace, he is in a private apartment being moved around from place to place every night. i think what isn't clear, what people still -- -- because it's pretty op
, hezbollah, shia groups in iraq, even the muslim brotherhood in egypt as its political allies in key regional arenas across the middle east. and this yearslong bet by the islamic republic of iran on these groups has paid off, because now their regional allies have become the most influential players in their respective arenas today. the result is that today it is the islamic republic of iran and its ideas of participatory islamist governance and an independent foreign policy that has real influence, real power in countries across the middle east from egypt to baa rape that were -- bahrain that were once clearly in america's camp. in strategic terms, the islamic republic of iran has been and is using through its narrative not its drones, not its tanks, through its narrative they are using the political awakening of middle eastern publics to alter the very nature of power politics in the middle east. as we describe in our book "downing to tehran," this has been an effective foreign policy and national security strategy for the islamic republic of iran, one that is exactly and repeatedly underap
for reasons you know in regard to relating to hezbollah in lebanon. how real is that danger and if it is going to happen, my question is, what are you going to do? at this point it seems it is already happening. >> there is a saying in lebanon, in time of nations change please save your head. >> what does that mean? >> it means we are disassociating ourself from what is going on in syria by all means. we are associating because we have a kind of a historical geographic relation with syria and now today if we take any position, really we would be more -- our lebanese society and between the lebanese citizens. we had a position to disassociate ourselves but this doesn't mean that we disassociate ourself from humanitarian issue. today we are helping and receiving syrians who are insuring for them, sheltering, medical care, schooling, food, everything. also this document mean that we don't have to put all scenarios in front of us and to see what kind of implication it will affect us in the future. i would love to talk about the options but before talking about options we have three questions we ha
force or hezbollah. we have a fundamental interest in helping the states of that area govern stably. and in the real world as it is today, happily, our values are generally embraced. and so that kind of government requires not using f-16s against your people, not, you know, machine gunning them to death, allowing elections to proceed in an open and honest way. this is not simply a question of we think everyone should be like us. this is a question of whether you want states to be stable in the world or whether you wallet the world to be a chaotic -- you want the world to be a chaotic hotwed of opportunities for our -- hotbed of opportunities. >> okay. can we take another question? yes, sir. [inaudible] >> congressman jo bonner, wanted to ask about the intelligence aspect and the brand nomination, how those two things may relate whether or not, you know, shifting from looking at state-based collecting and analysis as opposed to just looking so much more at not state actors, terrorist groups, things like that. >> will you repeat the question and answer it? >> the question is about int
, to not have the iranian revolutionary guard designated as a terrorist organization or for hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization. and has accused people of being a jewish lobby. i think he's not a good candidate. is not a very distinguished candidates for secretary of defense. he is not of the stature of leon panetta or bob gates or dick cheney or any of the people will ever been secretary of defense over the years. many of them are democrats. there are people in the democratic party who served from the clinton defense department to the obama defense department with management experience, which will be awfully important as there are budget constraints. he said that we should not be threatening the use of force. i don't know why the president selected chuck hagel. maybe he likes him personally. he was a mentor to him when he was a senator. it is really a mistake. it's not bipartisan. i think t it think too late. there's a low chance that chuck hagel will be defeated. a huge majority of republicans will oppose him. the question is what democrats will do. many democrats ar
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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